This little beauty has been on ‘The list’ for awhile, and I, along with others are so glad we got to explore this beautiful part of Tasmania.

 


Wineglass bay is nestled in the Freycinet National Park and is part of the Coles Bay tourism, located on the east coast fairly evenly between Hobart and Launceston airports.

 

The other beaches and bays in the area include, Hazards beach, cooks beach, Bryans beach and Coles Bay, nestled in Coles bay is Honeymoon Bay, which is a part of the Great Oyster Bay.

 

The Wineglass bay walk can range from 11km circuit to a 65km hike, with many overnight camp sites.
Being a National Park it is expected that what you take in, you take out, so pack smartly.

 

Our hiking expedition was a 30km extended circuit, so you can always tailor your walks to your needs and time limitations.

 

Day one of our outdoor adventures was to hike through Freycinet National Park admiring Wineglass Bay

 

 We arrived at the beginning of the track just before 7am, we headed in a clockwise direction to get the elevation over with first (smart idea!) and this allowed us to witness the stunning sunrise over Wineglass bay.

 



The beaches in Tasmania are so white, and some beaches have a lot of crushed shells, but the sand on Wineglass was quite soft and it’s a nice long beach to admire.

 


 

You can vier right at the track to continue on the Isthmus track that heads over to Hazard’s beach (part of the 11km circuit) or you continue along the beach at Wineglass.

The terrain after you come off the beach is a challenge, with a descent incline or ten up to Mt Graham and then up and up to Mt Freycinet.

The rock formations are quite bold, and the trail through these rocks are a good challenge.

 

 

Once we get to the top the views are spectacular and we are so grateful to those that have made these trails for us to discover and enjoy.

 

The trail down is just as crazy and requires some attention with your foot placements.

 

The trail over towards Hazards beach is enjoyable and you meet the sand and blue waters just between Cooks Beach and Hazards Beach, from here you can decide to go left to Cooks Beach and onto Bryan’s Beach, where we headed right towards Hazards Beach.

 

The terrain is easy with a few inclines, but no climbing as such.

 

 

Hazards Beach is beautiful and this part is a very long walk along the beach, you start of with enjoyment, but after a bit of time and some fatigue, you are a bit over the sand walking…

 

Along this beach the entrance from the 11km circuit meets up, so it’s great if you have hikers that would like to take their time and have a bit easier walk, as this is made up of more boardwalks.

We met up with many people here that had tackled the 11km walk for the day.

 

Once off the beach, the walk around the Fleurieu Point is beautiful with cliff top views of Coles Bay, the trails are cruise and you’ll pass a lot of day walkers, but it’s always a relief to see the day tourists coming the other way, because you know you’re nearing the end – especially when they are not in hiking gear.

 

Our hike took 8.5 hours carrying small daypacks with some food and water.
We never overload the packs to help keep a good pace and not have sore backs or shoulders.

 

The terrain was excellent with loads of variety, and the weather was spot on for us, we were blessed.
You are sheltered a lot throughout this walk with the trees, obviously the beach and bays you are exposed to and also a part of the trail between Mt Graham and Mt Freycinet.

 

I highly recommend this hike, you cannot beat when bush meets the sea…

 


Our day ended with a spectacular sunset over Great Oyster Bay at our accommodation in Freycinet.

 

 

Day two of our outdoor experience was to explore Coles Bay via kayaks for 3 hours…

 

 

Again blessed with perfect conditions, the water was calm and the sea was clear, so we could see the fish and bottom of the bay with ease. It was also great conditions for paddling as we did not have any headwinds to contend with.

 



Our Kayak guide Amber was enthusiastic and shared loads of local history about the aborigines and their survival tactics here in the area, their amazing communication to other tribes and then of course how the early settlers used this area of Tasmania.

 

Wineglass bay got its name because: When the whaling stations operated here, the water in the bay would turn red with the slaughtered creatures’ blood… not because the shape of the bay looks like a wine glass.

 

The weekend was full of activity and lots of fresh air, great company, many laughs, a few doubts (are we there yet…) and exceptional scenery in our beautiful country.

 

If you’d like to come on an adventure with me and others, to get away, unplug, regroup and feel rejuvenated (maybe a little bit stiff in the legs), then send me a message or join up to my email list for news of our upcoming adventures.

 

Connection and community is very important to your health and we all know we become disconnected through life. Social media might keep you posted on what others are doing, but it’s not helping mental health to those around us.

 

All the hikes have distances that suit your fitness level, and for some it’s a great focus or goal to work to, to be able to accomplish one of these spectacular hikes.

 

Here’s to your health, happiness and adventures…